scrapbooked ephemera items by Mr. Ned

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Mr. Ned (aka Ned Jolliffe) is an illustrator and designer from Oxford, England whose work can be seen on book covers, magazines and theatre posters. He has been compiling a scrapbook for about 10 years in which he pastes his collected ephemera items. "Juxtaposing a new bit or bob in its pages makes me very happy; It's not finished - there's lots of pages blank, and I fear the thing will disintegrate before I complete it,” says Ned.

"It's small, squarish little thing that has grown stout over the years from absorbing little ephemeral treasures as I trudge along the streets of wherever I happen to be at the time. My scrapbook is the one possession I would rescue from the raging flames."

To see more of Mr. Ned’s work, take a look at his portfolio here

Ex Postal Facto 2014

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A three day celebration of correspondence art, letter writing, and faux philatelics will be held this weekend in San Francisco. Ex Postal Facto runs tomorrow until Sunday at various venues around the city.  

Kicking off the conference the San Francisco Center for the Book will host an opening reception for their exhibition “Mail/Art/Book.” Showcasing pieces by contemporary artists working in the genre of correspondence art, the exhibition also provides a historical perspective of Networker/ postal culture in the bay area. 

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On Saturday a vendor expo will be held at the historic downtown San Francisco Elks Lodge, featuring small press publishers and artists whose work highlights faux postage (a.k.a artist stamps), postal art, and/or letter writing. 

Rounding out a weekend of events, the San Francisco Main Library hosts two different lectures. Featured speaker Lowell Darling will discuss his long-time association with the mail art scene in a panel titled “The History of West Coast Mail Art” moderated by San Francisco visual artist and writer John Held Jr..

Click here more information on the Ex Postal Facto 2014 conference. 

an ephemeral interlude

Shauna and James from Trigger sift through my random piles of ephemera and paper bits and pieces.

Shauna and James from Trigger sift through my random piles of ephemera and paper bits and pieces.

Finished Eclecto notebooks made with magazine makeready, lined paper that I designed and customized with ephemera.

Finished Eclecto notebooks made with magazine makeready, lined paper that I designed and customized with ephemera.

Today Shauna and James from Calgary advertising and design agency Trigger, stopped by for some mid-day creative fun. Throughout November, we've been hosting Thursday noon-hour creative workshops in UPPERCASE—offering designers a break from their usual routines and a chance to play. Today's session also offered me a nice pause from my desk; I've been glued to my computer—issue #16 is going to the printer next week!

I had a chance to rifle through some ephemera... enjoy!

Detail from a fire insurance certificate from 1904.

Detail from a fire insurance certificate from 1904.

Insurance document from 1914.
Insurance document from 1914.
A little box of anagram paper letters.

A little box of anagram paper letters.

Some embroidered letters still in their package.
Some embroidered letters still in their package.
Lucky initials for somebody!

Lucky initials for somebody!

Some makeready from an old issue and the diecut and foil-stamped Eclecto spines.

Some makeready from an old issue and the diecut and foil-stamped Eclecto spines.

Fire insurance for $500 and $6 deductible on a 1.5 story shingle roof. No lightning coverage. 1904.

Fire insurance for $500 and $6 deductible on a 1.5 story shingle roof. No lightning coverage. 1904.

type tuesday: sea foam bond

I love this simple packaging for typewriter paper. It's beautiful and gets to the point. The drop shadow and slightly awkward letterspacing is just icing on this sea foam cake.

type tuesday: stampede posters

For those of you not familiar with the Calgary Stampede, it is an annual exhibition and rodeo with midway rides, nightly fireworks and associated free pancake breakfasts scattered throughout the city (apparently there's an app for finding the breakfast nearest you). For ten days each summer, the city transforms into a strange cowboy and western set: hay bales are public seating, barnwood is tacked up on restaurant doorways, downtown office windows are painted with "yeehaws" and "howdy, partners". Not to mention the fashion: all shades of denim, bandanas, cowboy hats and boots (the more tassels, pattern and snaps the better)—it really aims to be the greatest outdoor show on earth. This year, the Stampede is marking its 100th year. I've lived in Calgary for 20 of them now, so I consider myself a proud Calgarian.

But Stampede is not quite my cup of tea... The Stampede is loud; I'm quiet. Beer tents and drinking is advertised as a featured activity; I don't drink. The midway offers bigger thrill rides; I have a weak stomach. Other than the fireworks and the photographic appeal of the midway at dusk, there's not a lot about Stampede that I can relate to.

I wonder what the early years of Stampede were like... I'd love to attend Stampede 1912 rather than 2012. Thanks to an exhibition in Art Central, I was able to a step back in time with the poster graphics of years gone by.

The exhibition is presented by AXIS Contemporary Art and Quintaro Graphic Reproduction and features digital poster reproductions on various substrates such as metal and rawhide. In addition to the typographic interest of the earliest posters, from a design standpoint it is interesting to see how versatile digital printing technology is. The show gave me lots of ideas of how I could reproduce graphic art and posters.

The posters will be on display until July 20th on the main level of Art Central, Calgary. (UPPERCASE's studio is on the upper level of Art Central.)