NCC: Michael Hepher of Clawhammer Letterpress

Michael Hepher is the owner and operator of Clawhammer Letterpress. Michael creates letterpress printed posters, coasters, cards and notebooks using presses made in the early 1900s. 

After working as a graphic artist for a few years, Michael was intrigued by the art of hand-set type, and through a connection with his local printer, ended up with a large press in his garage. After getting his hands on an original operating manual for the press, Michael immersed himself in the world of all things letterpress. In 2011, Michael and his wife Anie opened their shop in Fernie, British Columbia. 

For more information on Clawhammer Press and hand-set type, visit their website

NCC: Leave it to Cleaver

Becca Cleaver is a librarian and quilter from Calgary. It was Becca’s first time showing at New Craft Coalition, and she even transported all of her beautiful quilts, bibs and booties to the show using this awesome bike! You can follow Becca on Instagram to see behind-the-scenes photos of her gorgeous quilts and bibs. 

NCC: ceramicist Kalika Bowlby

Kalika Bowlby is a full time ceramicist who lives and works in Nelson, British Columbia. She studied ceramics at the Alberta College of Art and Design and also at Kootenay School of the Arts. 

“I make contemporary pottery to celebrate the pleasures of eating and drinking. Objects to bring more delight, and texture to life, made by hand for your hands. Objects to nourish you as much as the food you may serve,” says Kalika. 

To see more of Kalika’s work, be sure to take a look at her website

New Craft Coalition Spring Show + Sale

This past weekend, we were at the New Craft Coalition Spring Show + Sale in Calgary. We were happy to meet with some local subscribers and introduce ourselves to new ones. It was great to meet the other vendors and learn more about their beautiful work—we will be showcasing some of the artists who set up shop at the Spring Show + Sale. 

a wonderful day at the Heritage Park Festival of Quilts

I thoroughly enjoyed the Heritage Park Festival of Quilts today. Hailed as Western Canada's largest outdoor quilt show and market, quilts were on display throughout the park. Kudos to the organizers for curating the show and displaying each quilt to its best potential (even pairing them with similarly-hued buildings). Two large tents housed more prize-winning quilts as well as vendors from near and far who had excellent selections of quilt fabrics and accessories—and some really great prices, too. It was glorious!

Attention, letter-lovers in Calgary!!!

Signpainter Rick Janzen from Streamline Studios.

Signpainter Rick Janzen from Streamline Studios.

Happy students who participated in Rick Janzen's distressed signage workshop earlier this year. 

Happy students who participated in Rick Janzen's distressed signage workshop earlier this year. 

Thanks to the industriousness of Dale Pidlisny and the Better Letters Company (posted about previously here), Calgarians with steady hands and a love of lettering are in for a treat! A Better Letters workshop with local signpainter Rick Janzen is scheduled for June 28-29 right here in Calgary.

Rick has decades of experience in film and TV, heritage reproductions and commercial sign painting. His filmography includes Return to Gunsmoke and Brokeback Mountain to more recent films like Inception and Hell on Wheels.

Head over to Rick's blog to read how he transformed Calgary's Heritage Park into a movie set.

Head over to Rick's blog to read how he transformed Calgary's Heritage Park into a movie set.

"A short trailer for a documentary that I'm working on. It's about how the digital age has changed the sign industry and how it's made the art of hand lettering obsolete."

Space is limited to a dozen students, so register today to secure your spot!

Calgary: events with RandM Collective

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My friends Mike and Renata have been busy moving out of the Art Central building and into a new creative space. I look forward to seeing it soon!

NEXT Saturday at 2pm (rescheduled), Renata will be reading from her latest illustrated children's book, Once Upon a Memory by Nina Laden, the children's store Monkeyshines.

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The first event at the new RandM Collective space is the Sketch/Show next Wednesday (follow this link for details and email them for an invitation).

Finding Vivian Maier

The documentary Finding Vivian Maier will be screened this Thursday, November 21 as part of the Calgary Underground Film Festival. Vivian's history, and the story of how her photographic work came to light, is one of happenstance and curiosity and a singular passion.

New Craft Coalition: on now!

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Here's our table at Calgary's New Craft Coalition on now (Friday evening until 9pm) and all day Saturday (10-6). I took some quick shots this afternoon while the exhibitors were still setting up their final details. Please visit the New Craft Coalition for details on the artists and their work.

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Michael from Clawhammer Letterpress came all the way from BC.

Michael from Clawhammer Letterpress came all the way from BC.

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Woodcuts by Lisa Brawn.

Woodcuts by Lisa Brawn.

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Kalika Bowlby Pottery

Kalika Bowlby Pottery

Gillian Hillerud

Gillian Hillerud

Sarah Pike

Sarah Pike

Cathy Terepocki

Cathy Terepocki

 Cathy Terepocki

 Cathy Terepocki

Natalie Gerber

Natalie Gerber

 Natalie Gerber

 Natalie Gerber

Bee Kingdom Glass

Bee Kingdom Glass

Bee Kingdom Glass

Bee Kingdom Glass

PLANT terrariums

PLANT terrariums

Free admission!

Free admission!

Festival Hall, Inglewood, 1215 10 Ave SE.

Festival Hall, Inglewood, 1215 10 Ave SE.

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Have a crafty and creative weekend, everyone! 

In Tags

tomorrow: talking children's books

Books by Renata Liwska

Books by Renata Liwska

How Kids Books Are Made

Panel Discussion
Thursday Oct 17 from 3-5pm

Stanford Perrott Lecture Theatre / ACAD

The influence of children's books in culture and society can be easily underestimated, it's kids stuff after all! But children from all walks of life are reading children's books on a daily basis, or being read them, and often over and over (to some parents dismay). This daily diet of words and pictures can't help but have a huge influence on children, and through them, the world they are growing up to be an important part of.

It is a source of pride that ACAD alumni have contributed to this ongoing cultural evolution. The influence of ACAD's alumni has been growing steadily. In the early days, illustration grad Murray Kimber demonstrated through his richly painted books that our alumni can produce world class works of children's literature. This success was further nurtured by former faculty member Carolyn Fisher with her own book efforts and her active nurturing of students and peers. Her example has been carried further by bestselling and critically acclaimed artists such as Printmaking grad Jeremy Tankard, BFA grad Julie Morstad, and Illustration grad Renata Liwska. In the last couple of years the pace of alumni, new and old, being published seems to have reached a critical mass with over a dozen books being published.

We are pleased to be able to have some of these wonderful artists spend an afternoon to chat about their work and the business of making kids books—its joys and challenges.

Participating artists: Lincoln Agnew, Joy Ang, Jacqueline Hudon-Verrelli, Jacqui Lee, Renata Liwska, Jessica Phillips, and Kim Smith. With Special Guest Janine Vangool. 

UPPERCASE issue 11 with cover by Jon Klassen. This issue has a special feature about the children's book industry.

UPPERCASE issue 11 with cover by Jon Klassen. This issue has a special feature about the children's book industry.

The Elegant Cockroach written by Deidre Anne Martin and illustrated by Stefanie Augustine. A picture book for sophisticated children and whimsical adults! Designed and published by Janine Vangool, UPPERCASE.

upcoming event: How Kids Books Are Made

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Mark your calendar: Next Thursday from 3-5pm I will be one of many speakers at a children's book illustrator lecture at the Alberta College of Art & Design. 

Laura Sand, advertising & design

Laura at the portfolio show earlier this year.

Laura at the portfolio show earlier this year.

Laura's arrangement of business cards at the portfolio show.

Laura's arrangement of business cards at the portfolio show.

I met Laura Sand at the ACAD portfolio show in April. The presentation of her portfolio was very memorable and so I visited her portfolio site recently to see what she was up to. The video below is one that Laura made while still a student. Her concept was that she would "run to work" wherever an interview opportunity might present itself. Having quickly landed a job in a local advertising agency right out of school, she never needed to promote this project—but the quality of the video certainly demonstrates her skills and talent!

why Art Central failed

With the recent confirmation of the TELUS sky development at the corner of Centre Street and 7th ave SW, the days of the Art Central building are finite. As I mentioned in previous posts about the news of its demolition (here and here), I would like to express my opinion on why the Art Central concept failed. I think it is important to examine this while the experience is fresh. My intention is not to be negative—I hope that this post will offer insight and information valuable for other arts-based businesses, communities or similar concepts in Calgary's future. I have loved my time in Art Central and it was this location and concept that pushed me to move my career beyond freelance design into a satisfying and challenging career as a design and publishing entrepreneur. I will always be grateful for the nearly nine years that I called this building my creative home.

When I first visited Art Central in November of 2004 at its grand opening reception, it was love at first sight. There were just a few tenants at the time, but I was immediately taken by the potential of a three-level community of artists, artisans and designers. A fan of vibrant creative places like Vancouver's Granville Island, I had often wondered why my city didn't have something similar. 

At that point I had been working from home as a freelance designer for nearly a dozen years and I was itching to get out of the house and try something new. In Art Central, there was an empty unit with great big windows, a brick wall and a raw interior that really excited me. I knew it was a place where I could create my dream studio: an open concept design office with a bookstore component. I hoped that Art Central would be a destination for arts- and design-appreciative customers, drawing them to the bookstore and gallery aspect of this new venture. I was confident that my design business would grow and support the leasing costs, so "UPPERCASE gallery, books and papergoods" as it was called back then, would be a side experiment with no financial expectations. I didn't have a business plan, just a two-page letter describing my intentions along with some verifications of my ability to pay rent. And here I call myself out a bit: I didn't really know what I was getting into! I had hopes and dreams, but I didn't have the ability to make a proper long-term plan. Fortunately, I had a successful business that was carrying the burden of the lease and costs, but other early tenants were starting from scratch. I assume that, like me, they were taken by the concept but perhaps, like me, didn't have much more than a dream.

I was overjoyed when the landlord, Encorp, accepted my proposal and I became a tenant. The early mix of tenants was vibrant: painters, ceramicists, jewellers, fashion designers… all working in their studios, making the art that they were selling. There was a great restaurant serving affordable and excellent fare (I remember lineups for their upside-down pancakes for weekend brunches!), a quirky coffee shop and some anchor galleries with high quality offerings. For the first few years, it was exciting and challenging to be part of something new, to figure out how to bring in customers and to participate in events like First Thursdays which brought out some amazing crowds. We were buoyed by the potential. 

In my first year of business as UPPERCASE gallery, books and papergoods, I had around $30,000 in sales (this does not include my income from design). Had the gallery been all that I was relying on for income, this would not have been enough to support the business, let alone a family. Many Art Central tenants had side jobs or day jobs (with the added burden of staff) in order to make their rent. Because of the difficulties of personal schedules, juggling jobs and commitments outside of Art Central, business hours were often varied throughout the building, to the frustration of the visiting public. Consistent business hours and opening on weekends became a contentious issue and the landlord never enforced this lease requirement on its tenants, to the detriment of all.

From the public's point of view, there was always the perception that Art Central rent was subsidized or artists received governmental support in some way. This was definitely not the case, the tenants and the building owners were for-profit (whether profit was ever realized is another matter). The assumption that the artists were receiving other financial support became a problem within a few years. Our popular monthly First Thursday event had lots of attendance, but when you asked gallery owners about their sales, the increased traffic did not equate to higher sales. In recent years, First Thursday became a burden to many tenants and the event fizzled not only within Art Central but at other venues in downtown Calgary.

In the formative years, Art Central management provided marketing assistance through ad placements and even an occasional magazine-style publication inserted into the Herald. In the hey days, there was a budget for these initiatives—and as a designer specializing in arts and culture, I was pleased to provide these services to the landlord and have them as a client. I overhauled the Art Central logo, designed ads, photographed tenants and layed out their magazine. Because of this involvement in the "brand" of Art Central, I have always been particularly passionate about the concept and invested in its success in a way beyond a typical tenant.

Other practical factors that contributed to Art Central's difficulties was the years-long construction of The Bow tower and lack of easy and affordable parking (though we are conveniently accessed by the LRT right at the front door). A perplexing aspect throughout the years has been Calgary itself: the perception of the arts within Calgary; the stereotype of Calgary being just oil and gas, Stampede and Cowtown; the gulf between downtown and suburbia; and the lack of "life" downtown after hours and on weekends. 

The economic downturn had a huge impact on Art Central. We were at the peak of its potential and this is precisely the time when marketing should have continued in full force. Instead, marketing ceased. I think many tenants relied too heavily on the building to bring in customers, rather than finding their own specific customers. A negative attitude developed between some tenants and management, fostering gossip and rumours. Management became increasingly silent in their communications with tenants. Art Central lacked stewardship. Without a formal tenant organization, it was frustrating to band tenants together with a common vision and most meetings were for airing complaints rather than taking positive action.

Encorp's attention seemed to be diverted to other ventures such as Fashion Central a few blocks away. In our building, there were short-term tenants with wares of questionable quality. Vacancies increased overall. The common question asked by returning customers was, "What's happening to Art Central?" to which we had no answer. For my part, I closed the retail aspect of UPPERCASE at the end of 2009. By then I had launched the magazine and it showed much promise; I could not handle the investment of retail inventory plus print bills so the decision to pursue publishing was clear. I closed the retail aspect of my business with some regret, since my store and our events did bring in faithful regulars to Art Central and I knew that ending that era would impact my neighbours. However, success throughout my tenancy at Art Central was due to my flexibility and adaptability. My business has grown year after year and I am very fortunate. Willing to experiment to find my niche and customers over the years has been a strength. I am grateful I had this challenge through Art Central and that ultimately I have developed UPPERCASE publishing inc: creating a quarterly magazine and books for a small but international audience.

By the time the Art Central building was sold a few years ago to Allied Properties REIT, the Art Central concept was already in steady decline. Allied purchased property, not the concept. Remaining tenants tried to revive the concept with a new website and organizing events, but by then it was too difficult of a task. With the attrition of more tenants, less and less foot traffic and the persistent rumours of the building's redevelopment, it was impossible to resuscitate. Allied Properties have been good landlords and I have appreciated their forthright approach to the redevelopment. 

Though UPPERCASE will be leaving the building in August, Art Central tenants still require your support over the next few difficult months. Drink a great cup of coffee at DeVille, pick up a lovely floral bouquet by LaFleur, invest in great contemporary art by Axis Gallery, adorn yourself in beautiful handmade jewellery by Franny E, enjoy a meal at the Colonial… these tenants and many more are eager for your business. Thank you for being wonderful neighbours.

Thank you to all my customers and subscribers over the years. I've had the pleasure of getting to know you in person and online: you are generous, kind, motivating and your enthusiasm for UPPERCASE is simply amazing. Thank you.

 

lucky

Debris hauled out of flooded basements lined the streets of Sunnyside.

Debris hauled out of flooded basements lined the streets of Sunnyside.

We've been at home for a few nights now, and the big cleanup is done. Insurance adjusters were by yesterday, so that's in progress now too. All our utilities have been restored. The neighbourhood is looking good, through some people are still cleaning. We were absolutely amazed by city services, at how quickly the debris along the street was hauled away.

Wide angle view of the soggy stuff we brought to the curb.

Wide angle view of the soggy stuff we brought to the curb.

Not having all of that to look at is certainly better for morale. Firefighters knocked on our door more than once just to see if we needed any help, volunteers came by with food and water, food trucks provided great fare, and Peter's Drive In even brought chocolate milkshakes to volunteers. Really, it was the best possible state of emergency and we are LUCKY on all accounts. We're sad for our fellow citizens who lost a lot more or who have been permanently displaced from their homes.

We're so proud of our neighbourhood and our city (and our Supermayor Nenshi). Just a block from our house was "The Crisis Cafe", a meeting point for free food; a garage of free supplies like safety goggles and bleach; and a great big whiteboard where you could report the tasks that you needed help with and literally within minutes volunteers would cheerfully arrive at your house to help haul, demolish and clean. Having fresh people in every day to help out really helped to keep the energy up. Now that the frenzy is over, we're actually going to miss such community involvement. I hope there is a way that we can keep it going and show that care and dedication to less fortunate segments of Calgary's population.

Our first day back at home, Finley played with his favourite things.

Our first day back at home, Finley played with his favourite things.

Lucky artwork by Lisa Brawn.

Lucky artwork by Lisa Brawn.

creative calgary: wreck city

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A row of houses in my neighbourhood is slated for demolition (seems to be a recurring theme) and a community of artists have transformed the buildings before they're torn down. We headed down to see Wreck City before this art installation project ends tonight.

Though it was certainly interesting to see something like this on mass scale and I can see how this was a fun project for lots of young artists to do whatever they wanted, it did feel a bit like a missed conceptual opportunity. Perhaps there could have been some way to comment intelligently on development (ie 'progress'), on respect for the past, on recycling and upcycling, on 'home-fullness' and homelessness... or the history of the houses? Who used to live there? How do they feel about their former homes being torn down? Where are they now?

Maybe I missed some of these concepts as I held tightly to Finley's hand in some potentially hazardous spaces (for a curious 3-year-old) and juggled my camera. I'm not sure. (There was a house with a lineup and controlled entry that intrigued me but we couldn't wait in line.) The overall experience left me melancholic.

A commenter on the Wreck City site wrote something that I agree with:

"As a neighbour, I am glad to see the demolisher (aka Developer) interested in some of the neighbourhood’s culture by supporting WRECK CITY, however, I find it a bit funny that we’re going to have this influx of art and culture just to have the culture entirely wiped out by a colossal condominium spanning an entire city block in the heart of this heritage community." 

creative calgary: Esker Foundation

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Last week, Erin and I had the opportunity to meet with the folks at the Esker Foundation. I had heard good things about this new gallery in Calgary's Inglewood community, but hadn't yet had the chance to visit. We were in awe of the fantastic architecture as soon as we entered the building's atrium and not prepared at how spacious and dramatic the fourth-floor Esker Foundation Gallery truly is.

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From their website: "The Esker Foundation is the creation of local philanthropists and art patrons Jim and Susan Hill, and is the largest, privately funded, non-commercial gallery of its kind in Calgary. Esker is positioned as a cultural platform for innovative and exceptional temporary art exhibitions and educational events.

As the cornerstone of a new mixed use building in historic Inglewood, the Atlantic Avenue Art Block, the gallery features 15,000 square feet of environmentally controlled purpose built exhibition space designed by Kasian Architects and Interior Designers and operates within a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver accredited standards master plan created by Abugov Kaspar Architects."

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Our meeting was within the suspended nest which was perhaps the most architecturally interesting place I've ever attended a meeting. Throughout the space there were great views of Calgary and the Inglewood neighbourhood. We also enjoyed the excellent exhibition of Landon Mackenzie's large scale paintings and smaller drawings.

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Make a visit to the Esker top on your list next time you're in Inglewood... they're open every day except Monday and admission is completely free.

creative calgary: Stash

Veronica Murphy, proprietor of Stash Needle Art Lounge in Calgary's Inglewood neighbourhood.

Veronica Murphy, proprietor of Stash Needle Art Lounge in Calgary's Inglewood neighbourhood.

Stash is a few blocks off of the main street in Inglewood at 1B, 1215 – 13th Street SE, nestled in corner of the Woodstone Studios building.

Stash is a few blocks off of the main street in Inglewood at 1B, 1215 – 13th Street SE, nestled in corner of the Woodstone Studios building.

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The welcoming centre of Stash, where you can sit, knit and chat over a cup of tea.

The welcoming centre of Stash, where you can sit, knit and chat over a cup of tea.

A store copy of Dottie Angel, at the ready to inspire you as you sit down and be crafty.

A store copy of Dottie Angel, at the ready to inspire you as you sit down and be crafty.

The store's display fixtures are all repurpose vintage finds, showing everything to desirable effect.

The store's display fixtures are all repurpose vintage finds, showing everything to desirable effect.

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A record player sets a relaxing retro vibe.

A record player sets a relaxing retro vibe.

Old suitcases hide workshop supplies.

Old suitcases hide workshop supplies.

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A wander over to Stash will be worth your while; as you can see, the place is full of beautiful vignettes, enticing yarns and a relaxed atmosphere. Stash offers various workshops from introductions to knitting and crochet to project-specific classes.

Follow the Stash blog, Pinterest and Twitter for the latest.

We Should Know Each Other

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We Should Know Each Other made for a fun afternoon. Thank you to Erin and Eleanor for helping our visitors make buttons and beaded necklaces. I enjoyed taking some photos of the event, but more specifically how the former school is being transformed into an arts incubator space.

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UPPERCASE shared classroom 309 with Gary McMillan, or rather "Maestro McMillan, Ouija Self-Portrait Mediator" aka painter with a very long paintbrush. (Or "finglonginator" if I may use a Futurama reference...)

The notion was that Glen, seated, would subconsciously guide Maestro Gary during this portrait session.

The notion was that Glen, seated, would subconsciously guide Maestro Gary during this portrait session.

Glen kept his eyes closed throughout the session.

Glen kept his eyes closed throughout the session.

The resulting painting had a likeness of Glen, except for the angry eyebrows.

The resulting painting had a likeness of Glen, except for the angry eyebrows.

Paint spatter and dribbles are part of the process.

Paint spatter and dribbles are part of the process.

Though UPPERCASE won't be participating tomorrow, WSKEO is still in full swing on Sunday, so please check out the event at the old King Edward school. Calgary is hoping with activities this weekend, so my family and I will be enjoying Heritage Park's Train Days tomorrow.