Summer Hours

Starting in July, our summer hours are Monday through Friday from 10am to 5pm and Saturday from noon to 4pm. This Saturday, we are open from 11-5pm. The shop is closed Sunday, Monday and Tuesday for a long weekend and Canada Day. (please note that the Art Central building is also closed on Canada Day.)

Old School: Holli Conger

Something's happening over there...

Old School: e.soule

esoule.jpg
Old School contributor Elizabeth Soule does some lovely Polaroid compositions using small toys. The series above is from The Little Zoo (available on Etsy). You can also follow her work on Flickr, her website and blog.

esoule2.jpg 

Flowers by Rabi-M

Errands this morning

I'm a bridesmaid this weekend for my best-friend-since-grade-nine's wedding. So I'm off to get a haircut and do a few errands. The store will be open again at 1(ish) pm today.

Old School: Lisa Congdon

Old School: preorder

Sketchbook: Stefanie Augustine

Photographer Aldo Sperber

sperber.jpg
Paris-based photographer Aldo Sperber introduced his work to me via email. I found this pair of images to be particularly striking.

I welcome and encourage you to email me links to your portfolios or sites of interest and I will post them in the UPPERCASE journal. info {@} uppercasegallery dot ca

Type Tuesday: Decisions Decisions

decisionsdecisionsprint1.jpg
Jamie Wieck has created a poster depicting the decisions leading up to whether or not to eat at a particular London restaurant. The resulting info graphic looks fantastic as a fabric:
decisionsdecisions2.jpg

This poster depicting the miscellaneous objects found in a kitchen drawer is fun: 

49objects4.jpg
The format of his online portfolio poses questions, and his designs provide the visual answers. This is a great way of introducing the work since the heart of graphic design is to solve problems. Wieck answers the questions with style, wit and intelligence. (Rediscovered via Robot Walrus)

Work/Life: Marco Cibola

marco.jpg
Work/Life illustrator Marco Cibola has just launched a new website with updated illustration work as well as personal projects. The image above appears in the book, and the skull image below is currently exhibited in the gallery and online shop. (That's me reflected in the glass.)

cibola_large.jpg

Type Tuesday: Typographic decor

Type Tuesday: Comfortable Type

Type Tuesday: Wearable Type

Type Tuesday: Typography

Type Tuesday: The Constitution

Work/Life update

All of the promotional copies have been mailed to our participants' dream clients as well as a list of the top publishers, designers and advertising agencies across North America. Work/Life is being well-received and many people have emailed in to thank us for sending them a copy. One of our participants has been hired by Chronicle Books, thanks to the project. 

I have sent the book to all the main design/illustration magazines, so hopefully they will decide to mention Work/Life. Communication Arts online will be featuring it in early August in their Exhibit category. The online preview is on fire: it has surpassed 16,000 views! The book will be for sale at the upcoming ICON illustration conference in New York.

At the end of June, the book's cover price will return to its regular price ($24.95) so I encourage you to purchase your copy now while it is just $20! (Participants - if you'd like additional copies, just let me know)

WLcover380.jpg

Old School: Tonja Torgerson

Old School: research

kindergarten.jpg
I've been so enthralled with the pictures in this book, that I haven't gotten to actually reading it yet. It is called Inventing Kindergarten by Norman Brosterman, 1997. The photographs are by Kiyoshi Togashi.

Inventing Kindergarten is the first comprehensive book about the origin of kindergarten, a revolutionary education program for children that was created in the 1830s by charismatic German educator Friedrich Froebel. Froebel's kindergarten was the most successful system for teaching children about art, design, mathematics, and natural history ever devised. Kindergarten changed the world, and this book tells its story.