Etsy & UPPERCASE: let the long weekend begin

Added on by Erin.

We'll conclude our Etsy & UPPERCASE week and kick off your Labour Day long weekend with this message:

Sparrow Nest Script

Sparrow Nest Script

We hope you've enjoyed this special week celebrating the talent and inspiration to be found on Etsy.

Etsy & UPPERCASE: Leah Giberson

Added on by Janine.
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To keep that summer feeling alive, the simplest solution is to purchase a print (or original!) Leah Giberson and hang it in your home to admire year-round. Lawn chairs, pools, airstream trailers and California homes are typical subject matter... but depicted in a not-so-typical way. Leah uses photographs as the base inspiration for her paintings, but with her use of graphic colours, shadows and composition she elevates the subjects into icons.

Cleverly edited Noe Valley, San Francisco

Cleverly edited Noe Valley, San Francisco

UPPERCASE featured Leah back in issue 6's Work-in-Progress Society pages.

Your subject matter is a nostalgic suburbia full of lush greens, manicured lawns and perfect skies. The scenes are idealized vignettes depicting manmade environments—the perfect house, a shiny Airstream trailer—yet the paintings are devoid of people. Your creative process, in which you paint over photographs, allows you to become an editor as well as an artist. What do you choose to exclude and why?

I paint over anything that feels unnecessary or distracting. This often includes neighboring homes, buildings, trees, and occasionally people. After simplifying the scene, I can focus on the parts that resonate with me like the looming shadows, tenuous connections of power lines or the reflected worlds visible in windows or on shiny surfaces. This process of distillation and embellishment is something we all do in our daily lives already. We highlight some moments, cover up others and either ignore or make assumptions about the rest in an attempt to find meaning in our experiences and reinforce our existing narratives. In short, we see what we want to see. 

Bernal Heights, without neighbours.

Bernal Heights, without neighbours.

Why are you drawn to these particular scenes? What do they represent to you?

Suburbia has always been intriguing, yet foreign to me. I was raised by artists deep in the woods of New Hampshire in a cluttered old farmhouse full of art and all things handmade but we also had our share of painful struggle as a family. I learned about suburban life mostly from TV shows and on trips to visit my grandparents. From my limited and naïve perspective, I assumed the families in these homes felt safe, happy and at ease in their seemingly perfect worlds. I wanted that in my life too. As an adult I now realize that a flawlessly groomed lawn or manicured hedge does not guarantee any of those things, but I remain fascinated by these places and the disconnect between their fact and fiction. 

How has posting work on Flickr been part of your development as an artist?

A couple years ago I started using Flickr on a daily basis when I was commissioned to make a large painting and wanted to post images of my progress for my client to see. Before I knew it, there were lots of other people leaving thoughtful comments and initiating some pretty interesting dialogues. I also discovered that I was reaching a MUCH larger and rapidly expanding audience than I ever had with my etsy shop, portfolio site or neglected blog. Flickr quickly became and has remained an integral part of my work flow and the site I update and check out more than any other.

In addition it has also led to a series of somewhat collaborative work. During the summer of 2008 I came across a photograph on Flickr that completely captivated me. Until that point I had only used my own photographs in my work, but I desperately wanted to make a painting based on this one. I contacted the photographer and asked for her permission. It turned out that she was thrilled with the idea and (I’m happy to say) with the results. Since then, I have completed at least 30 small paintings based on other people’s photographs and continue to look for new images out there that resonate with me. The photographers I’ve worked with thus far have been incredibly generous, enthusiastic and appreciative. It’s been a wonderfully positive and inspiring experience and has connected me with people and places from all around the world.

Etsy & UPPERCASE: owl factory

Added on by Erin.
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In issue #11 Glen wrote a piece about owls and their wisdom. We found this charming video on The Etsy Blog. It's a wonderfully inspiring meld of craft and animation—and an amazing example of marketing a handmade product. The owls along with many other items are available in the Owl Know How Etsy shop. 

Etsy & UPPERCASE: Linzee McCray

Added on by Janine.

I "met" one of our regular contributors, Linzee McCray, through Etsy. I was doing some research on a story about Type Truck and discovered Linzee's excellent article on the Etsy blog. She covered everything I was hoping to write about in the article, so rather than reinvent the wheel, I contacted Linzee and Etsy to see if we could update the article and run it in issue #12.

Later, I commissioned Linzee to write about oilcloth, featured in the current issue #14. The article features two Etsy sellers:

Modern June

Modern June

Oilcloth by the Yard

Oilcloth by the Yard

We can all look forward to a new article from Linzee in issue #16 next year! 

Read through Linzee's archive of Etsy posts here >>>

Etsy & UPPERCASE: century of the child

Added on by Erin.
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A post on The Etsy Blog introduced us the MoMA exhibition The Centruy of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900-2000.  For those of us not lucky enough to visit New York before early November, there's a remarkable exhibition website. This cave of wonders goes beyond a mere survey of toys and extends into the dark realities of political conflict and exploitation in the lives of children. 

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In 1900, Swedish design reformer Ellen Key stated that the ‘century of the child’ was upon us, predicting that we’d spend the next 100 years addressing how children should be raised and nurtured. Now, we can safely say that Key was right. We live in a time where dad bloggers, car seat designers, Diaper Genies and mountains of parenting books are the norm. Century of the Child: Growing by Design, a new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, begins with Key’s statement and tries to explain how we got to this point, through a history of children’s toys and memorabilia.
— Chappell Ellison for The Etsy Blog
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Double-page spread from A War-Time Handbook for Young Americans (1942)

Double-page spread from A War-Time Handbook for Young Americans (1942)

All photos by Museum of Modern Art

Etsy & Uppercase: Mary Kate McDevitt

Added on by Erin.

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The handlettering and illustration work of Mary Kate McDevitt is a favourite of team UPPERCASE. Her Etsy shop is full of prints, cards and other goodies. 

Etsy & UPPERCASE: typewriters

Added on by Erin.

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Nothing makes me swoon at a flea market like a shiny Royal typewriter. And if it happens to be my favorite shade of bubblegum pink, I’m a total goner. It’s not an unusual sentiment—despite their bulk, price, and high-maintenance needs, typewriters inspire adoration from vintage lovers everywhere.
— Lisa Butterworth on The Etsy Blog

You already know about our love of all things typewriters here at UPPERCASE. The Etsy Blog also celebrated this beloved machine with a post by Lisa Butterworth. An Etsy search for typewriter can yield some fascinating results—from jewellery to pop-cards and actual machines. You'll also stumble across the modified typewriter below.

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Etsy & UPPERCASE: a place under my tree

Added on by Erin.
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Pam Garrison loves UPPERCASE so much that she cuts us up—using back issues to create her journals. Her blog came up in my alerts recently and it lead me to her Etsy shop. Then...I fell in love with her. In fact, a few people I love will be getting some of Pam's amazing work this holiday season.

Happy day indeed. 

Etsy & UPPERCASE: Sushipot Vintage

Added on by Janine.

The current issue, #14, features the Etsy seller Suzanna Scott's collection of vintage play blocks. Suzanna actually has two shops: Sushipots Vintage sells beautiful old toys, instant collections and fodder for creativity and Sushipot highlights Suzanna's original collages and assemblages.

Vintage Sewing Basket full o' Crafty Notions

Vintage Sewing Basket full o' Crafty Notions

Suzanna's product shots are fantastic!

Suzanna's product shots are fantastic!

Sushipot art block.

Sushipot art block.

Such a gorgeous photo makes these little game pieces all the more appealing.

Such a gorgeous photo makes these little game pieces all the more appealing.

Etsy & UPPERCASE: part of my everyday

Added on by Janine.
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Almost a year ago, I purchased this set of Melmac dishes from Auction Junkies. I wanted to get some child-friendly dishes for Finley; something small that would fit on his highchair tray—and that could withstand the occasional fall (or toss!) to the floor. This inexpensive (just $12 plus shipping) odd set with three cups, multiple saucers and shallow bowls, has seen daily use. He stores the dishes in his play kitchen, so they see double duty: for food and for fun.

type tuesday: Thrift Score on Etsy

Added on by Janine.

Some clever merchandising in Thrift Score makes some plastic letters oh-so-appealing (vintage fabric not included, alas.)

type tuesday: Housewarming, an Etsy shop with a love of old type

Added on by Janine.
(At home, I have a few cash register flags planted next to some houseplants that need support.)

(At home, I have a few cash register flags planted next to some houseplants that need support.)

This looks like a good prop for artist Christopher Stott!

This looks like a good prop for artist Christopher Stott!

San Francisco-based Etsy shop Housewarming has a wonderfully curious supply of old apothecary bottles, sign pieces and other covetable objects for type-lovers.

berkeley typewriter

Added on by Janine.
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I was in Berkeley today, so I paid a visit to Berkeley Typewriter. I will share extensive images soon (when he saw the typewriter on my business card and found out I was visiting from Canada, the repairman let me take pictures in the back room!), but for now here is a tantalizing instagram.

Etsy & UPPERCASE: urban legend

Added on by Janine.
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I absolutely love Kateri Morton's necklaces made from vintage lucite beads. These two shown above, in fact, are ones that are part of my daily wardrobe. Look for a "Frugal and Fancy" column about Kateri's Etsy shop, Urban Legend, in the fall issue of UPPERCASE (out in October).

Gaudy strands of beads…

Gaudy strands of beads…

get remade into sophisticated studies of colour.

get remade into sophisticated studies of colour.

Etsy & UPPERCASE: KateFete

Added on by Erin.

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There's a lovely interview with Kate Slater on The Etsy Blog. In addition to her work as a childrens book illustrator, Kate has an Etsy shop featuring her collage and paper cut illustration called KateFete

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My illustrations are made from a combination of collage and cut-outs. I usually suspend individual collaged pieces from wires which I then photograph to create the final image. It’s a rather bizarre process, but I gradually moved towards collage while I was at university and I’ve always loved making 3D pieces from wire so it seemed quite natural to combine the two. I hoard paper and have stacks and stacks of old magazines and insides of envelopes.
— Kate Slater as told to The Etsy Blog
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Etsy & UPPERCASE: i left my heart in San Francisco

Added on by Janine.
print by Laura Amiss

print by Laura Amiss

art by Bridgett Hall

art by Bridgett Hall

Lorena Siminovich, Petit Collage

Lorena Siminovich, Petit Collage

photographic print by Racetay

photographic print by Racetay

MyanSoffia

MyanSoffia

Jen Zahigian

Jen Zahigian

We're enjoying our last day in San Francisco... here are some ways to capture that spirit through prints and photos available on Etsy.

creative friends

Added on by Erin.

We've been cooking up something with our friends at Etsy.

Today marks the start of Etsy & UPPERCASE week!

You can expect images from our favourite shops and some excerpts and links to some of Etsy's excellent blog content. If you happen to visit their blog today, you may recognize something from issue #14. We hope you'll enjoy what we have in store!

featured stockist: Rare Device

Added on by Janine.
Rare Device is located at 600 Divisadero Street (at Hayes Street) in San Francisco.

Rare Device is located at 600 Divisadero Street (at Hayes Street) in San Francisco.

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Giselle Gyalzen, owner of Rare Device

Giselle Gyalzen, owner of Rare Device

A wonderful stockist and great place to meet UPPERCASE readers.
Dynamo Donuts... mmmm. Maple bacon apple anyone?

Dynamo Donuts... mmmm. Maple bacon apple anyone?

Glen hauled 4 dozen donuts on two buses (worth it!)

Glen hauled 4 dozen donuts on two buses (worth it!)

Our current issue features Jon Klassen's illustration on the cover.

Our current issue features Jon Klassen's illustration on the cover.

Nicely curated children's tees, toys and books.

Nicely curated children's tees, toys and books.

Everything was tempting.

Everything was tempting.

Lots of things for paper-lovers. Eye spy some Rifle Paper Co. notebooks: look for an interview with Anna Bond in the fall issue of UPPERCASE, out in October.

Lots of things for paper-lovers. Eye spy some Rifle Paper Co. notebooks: look for an interview with Anna Bond in the fall issue of UPPERCASE, out in October.

It was lovely to meet Heidi Swanson! (We featured her in issue 9 which had a theme on how a love of food inspires creativity. I still remember how excited I was when she first subscribed to the magazine.)

It was lovely to meet Heidi Swanson! (We featured her in issue 9 which had a theme on how a love of food inspires creativity. I still remember how excited I was when she first subscribed to the magazine.)

Lisa Shaffer of Zelma Rose Handmade Goods was there—her cross-stitched jewellery are featured in issue 14's zigzag trend page and also stocked in Rare Device.

Lisa Shaffer of Zelma Rose Handmade Goods was there—her cross-stitched jewellery are featured in issue 14's zigzag trend page and also stocked in Rare Device.

Zelma Rose necklaces.

Zelma Rose necklaces.

So many beautiful things for the home.

So many beautiful things for the home.

Here's Caitlin Kirkpatrick, my new editor at Chronicle Books. Look for the official announcement of our project later this fall.

Here's Caitlin Kirkpatrick, my new editor at Chronicle Books. Look for the official announcement of our project later this fall.

There was lovely natural light in the shop, especially late in the afternoon.

There was lovely natural light in the shop, especially late in the afternoon.

It was great to meet so many supporters of the magazine and to hear stories about why you appreciate it so much. It makes all our hard work worthwhile to know that UPPERCASE magazine has such a positive effect on your lives.

Thank you to Giselle for graciously allowing us to host our event in Rare Device, and for supporting indie publishing and artists in such a great store. We can't wait to visit again.

My presentation from the Evernote conference

Added on by Janine.

Evernote has created a shared notebook where you can download the slides from the various presenters. I've also made a page that brings together my presentation and Evernote techniques. I'll share more tips and tricks there periodically.

&

Added on by Erin.
Gemma Correll

Gemma Correll

This week's final post from our image hunter Shelley Davies is all about the ampersand. Visiting the sites of our two ampersand artists is a great Friday trip down the rabbit hole. Gemma Correll's site is full of cute rollovers and fresh content. Anna Raff's Ornithoblogical may be hard to spell but is a delightful image-based blog that 'showcases the birds on her brain'.   

Anna Raff

Anna Raff

We did some research on the origins of the ampersand and found an article on typography.com that is a nice way to end this post.