olympic correspondence: action and suspense

Day 4 of the Olympics yesterday started out with a focus on famous British films, or at least films that had their origin in Great Britain. 
MABEE, ROB MABEE. SECRET AGENT FOR AXIS CONTEMPORARY ART AND OLYMPIC CORRESPONDENT FOR UPPERCASE

MABEE, ROB MABEE. SECRET AGENT FOR AXIS CONTEMPORARY ART AND OLYMPIC CORRESPONDENT FOR UPPERCASE

Before I went to Olympic park last night for the swimming events I had a couple of hours so I went to the Barbican to see Designing 007, 50 Years of Bond Style, a fun-filled look at the imagination and film wizardry of some of my favourite guilty-pleasure films. No photography allowed in there however I did get a few pictures in the areas outside the proper exhibition.
The truly great part of any great city is those little unexpected surprises it presents and London is no exception. The world's oldest underground system, the Tube, spiderwebs stories beneath the surface. Many of London's tube stations are known for some spectacular mosaics tile creations. Tottenham Court's mosaics in Central London are well known as thousands swarm past them on their daily commute but yesterday I found a wonderful surprise in east London at the tube station of Leytonstone. In 1899 Alfred Hitchcock was born a Leytonplace shopkeeper's son and to commemorate his centennial the Greenwich Mural Workshop were commissioned to produce a series of murals representing his films and career. Gorgeous vibrant pieces in the most unexpected of places.
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